Journerdism

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Bloggers get a financial lift from Scoopt, Blogburst has a new competitor

Two scoops--words and pictures. Scoopt, the citizen journalist photography agency that helps users sell photos and video to the press, has opened a new wing of their business, Scoopt Words.

Here’s their pitch:

It’s quick and easy. Sign up with ScooptWords, carry a button on your blog and editors can click to buy content they want to print and you want to sell.

We believe that your blog writing can be every bit as valuable as professional journalism. It’s the same idea that lies behind Scoopt the picture agency: in the right circumstances, amateur photography is just as valuable as professional photography… as we have proven again and again.

So if your content is valuable, why shouldn’t you be paid for it? Why is it OK for a newspaper to lift your words or publish your writing for free just because you’re an ‘amateur’? If it’s good enough to print, it’s good enough to pay for.

Robin Hamman notes:

As the ScooptWords guys tell you in the comments on this post, it’s not like blogburst because you get paid and you still own your stuff… ;-)

In theory, couldn’t people just put a “buy this blog entry” button on their blogs? Sure, you get “Nightcap Syndication” with Scoopt Words but that doesn’t look like much beyond a basic site set up with the stock Joomla! template.

It seems that Technorati or one of the dozens of other blog search engines would be smart to develop a profit sharing/blog content selling service. (Right now, Technorati seems the most poised with their new relationship with AP.) Maybe I’m just thinking a few years ahead of myself.

UPDATE: Kyle MacRae from Scoopt replies to my “just put a button on your blog” question:

Yes, absolutely. But think of it from the other end of the equation. Does an editor really want to have to negotiate a one-off deal with a blogger who may be in a different time zone and may use a different currency (and who may know nothing about licensing, copyright and the value of words)? Or would that editor rather have a single billing account with a single trusted broker that gives him/her direct one-click hassle-free access to millions of blogs?

Thing is, at ScooptWords we’ve all been freelance journalists (some of us still are) and we appreciate that the ONLY way to win the hearts and budgets of editors is by making their lives as easy as possible. That’s what ScooptWords sets out to do.

Touche, MacRae. Big ups on the concept and the transparency to address my question directly. What newspaper editor would reply to a blog entry short of John Temple at the Rocky Mountain News? Maybe Scoopt is on to something.

One Comment

  1. “In theory, couldn’t people just put a “buy this blog entry” button on their blogs?”

    Yes, absolutely. But think of it from the other end of the equation. Does an editor really want to have to negotiate a one-off deal with a blogger who may be in a different time zone and may use a different currency (and who may know nothing about licensing, copyright and the value of words)? Or would that editor rather have a single billing account with a single trusted broker that gives him/her direct one-click hassle-free access to millions of blogs?

    Thing is, at ScooptWords we’ve all been freelance journalists (some of us still are) and we appreciate that the ONLY way to win the hearts and budgets of editors is by making their lives as easy as possible. That’s what ScooptWords sets out to do.

    Cheers for your interest!
    Kyle